On September 27, 2017, California Governor Jerry Brown signed an extension of the Urban Agricultural Incentive Zones Act. Rather than sunsetting on January 1, 2019, the Act now extends until January 1, 2029.

The Act, originally authored by Assemblymember Phil Ting and enrolled in 2013 as Government Code Section 51042, permits certain local governments to voluntarily enter into contracts with property owners who commit to using their property for agricultural use in exchange for property tax breaks.

Continue Reading Urban Agricultural Incentive Zones Act Extended

In many cases California’s property tax rules automatically penalize insufficiently counseled individuals who inherit interests in real estate-owning legal entities from a family member upon their death. To avoid this penalty, recipients of these interests need to ensure that Form BOE 100-B is filed within 90 days of their family member’s death, a task few are prepared to undertake at that time.

Individuals who acquire real estate often do so using legal entities they control, such as corporations, LLCs, or partnerships to protect themselves from any personal liability that could arise with respect to the real estate.

California’s property tax rules require that individuals who hold interests in real estate-owning legal entities notify the Board of Equalization (“BOE”) when they transfer interests in those legal entities in two situations:

Continue Reading The BOE Death Trap: Avoid Property Tax Penalties on the Death of a Family Member

Those familiar with conservation easements know that to qualify for a federal tax deduction, a conservation easement must meet several rigorous requirements found in Internal Revenue Code Section 170 and Section 1.170A-14 of the Treasury Regulations, not the least of which is the requirement that the easement be granted “in perpetuity.” In addition, the easement must be subject to “legally enforceable restrictions” (such as by recordation) that will prevent uses inconsistent with the conservation purposes of the donation.

Continue Reading Unsurprising Façade Easement Holding by Tax Court: Conservation Easement Must Be Recorded to Qualify for Deduction

Donating Fund InterestsDue to increased valuation of public and private equities, coupled with the upcoming end of the sunset provision that allows hedge fund managers to defer taxation on fees earned offshore,[1] there is an increased interest among hedge fund and private equity managers to donate a portion of their fund interests to charity.  The goal is to allow a manager to avoid ordinary income or capital gains tax and/or to obtain a tax deduction while accomplishing his or her philanthropic goals.  In order to make the most of any such charitable giving plan, managers need to appreciate that the amount of any charitable deduction will vary depending on the character of the donated property and the type of organization that receives the gift.

Continue Reading Donating Fund Interests: A “Why Now?” and “How To” Primer

photo-1454165804606-c3d57bc86b40The February 15, 2017 deadline for nonprofit organizations in California seeking to initially obtain or renew exemption from property taxes is quickly approaching, and there are changes to the reporting requirements if your organization allows third parties to use your property.

An increased concern amongst many tax-exempt organizations is how to report use of their property by private persons or non-exempt organizations.

Continue Reading Annual Filing for Welfare Exemption Due On or Before February 15th

On November 4, 2016, the IRS updated its Conservation Easement Audit Techniques Guide (CE Audit Guide) for the first time since March 15, 2012.

According to the IRS’s introduction on its Audit Techniques Guide website, Audit Techniques Guides (ATGs) are developed to help IRS examiners during audits by explaining issues and accounting methods within specific industries. ATGs are also meant to provide guidance to small business owners and tax professionals for tax planning purposes within those industries. However, each ATG contains a disclaimer that it is not “an official pronouncement of the law or position of the Service and cannot be used, cited, or relied upon as such.” This article will not explain the CE Audit Guide in depth, but rather discuss the specific updates made in November.

Continue Reading IRS Updates Conservation Easement Audit Techniques Guide

accountant-accounting-adviser-advisor-159804A new private ruling may be of great interest to clients with substantial real estate interests who wish to contribute one or more properties to a family foundation.  The ruling suggests that payment by the foundation to a property management entity controlled by the donor may be permissible under the personal services exception.

Continue Reading Private Ruling Exempts Property Management Services from Self-Dealing

The case of Salus Mundi Foundation et al v. Commissioner

Transferee LiabilityOn August 15, 2016, the Tax Court decided in Salus Mundi Foundation et al v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo. 2016-154, that two foundations were liable as transferees for a corporation’s unpaid federal tax liability after another foundation distributed to the foundations the proceeds of the sale of the corporation’s stock.

The history in this case involves a marital trust that initially owned all of the stock in a C corporation called Double-D Ranch.  Later, a portion of the stock was transferred to the Diebold Foundation in New York.  Subsequent to that, the Diebold Foundation in New York sold the stock and distributed the proceeds from the sale of Double-D Ranch stock to three foundations formed by the Diebold children, pursuant to a New York state-approved plan of dissolution.

Continue Reading Transferee Liability: The [Unlikely] Situation that your Nonprofit Receives a Charitable Gift with Expensive Tax Strings Attached

photo-1445297983845-454043d4eef4The Tax Court, in a case of first impression, has recently ventured into the perpetuity minefield.  One Dr. Douglas Carroll and spouse Deirdre Smith, of Baltimore, Maryland, conveyed a conservation easement in 2005 over approximately 26 acres of open land in Maryland, mostly pastureland zoned for agricultural uses, to the Maryland Environmental Trust (MET) and the Land Preservation Trust (LPT).  The former organization is a quasi-governmental agency, the latter a private, nongovernmental exempt organization.  The protected property consisted of two parcels of unequal size; upon the smaller parcel sat the taxpayers’ two-story primary residence, and, on the larger, a small (1,000-square-foot) house where a farmhand tenant  resided.

Continue Reading Lurching Towards Perpetuity

taxThe IRS Office of Chief Counsel recently released Information Letter 2016-0036 in response to questions regarding the taxation of crowdfunding revenue. In it the IRS concluded that crowdfunding revenue is taxable to the extent it is received in exchange for services or property.

Continue Reading Thinking of Crowdfunding Your Project? Beware – the Taxman Cometh